“By no means Lose Your Hustle;” A Remembrance of Seton Corridor’s “Shep”

The worth of coaches as nice lecturers has in all probability by no means been greater than it’s within the distracted world we stay in as we speak.  Colleague Dave Siroty penned this piece on Seton Corridor’s  longtime baseball skipper Mike Sheppard, who handed away this previous week. “Shep” together with a handful of different coaches just like the late Rutgers Skipper Fred Hill Sr. helped develop and form faculty baseball, a forgotten stepchild in most elements of the Northeast, right into a nationwide energy for over 1 / 4 century.

Dave authored a e book on 4 of Shep’s stars,The Hit Men and the Kid Who Batted Ninth: Biggio, Valentin, Vaughn & Robinson: Together Again in the Big Leagues,” and likewise is engaged on Jamspals, a web site that pairs children injured in athletics with faculty {and professional} athletes who’ve overcome damage, an concept that got here from his son Michael.  Dave labored intently with Seton Corridor baseball throughout his time within the  athletic division there, and bought to see Shep’s work up shut. Listed here are his ideas…

 

All of us in athletics have come throughout coaches who’ve modified our lives. Not due to their successful and fame, however as a result of they taught us so much though we didn’t play for them. Though we had been colleagues, we couldn’t assist however study from them.

A kind of folks in my life was Mike Sheppard, Sr., the top baseball coach for a few years at Seton Corridor College. He spent his whole life as a part of Seton Corridor and his household is as tied to the college as any may very well be.
Shep handed away this weekend and we misplaced a man who outlined the phrase, “coach.”
I used to be lucky sufficient to work with Shep for a number of years, together with the 1987 baseball season when he produced one of many all-time nice faculty groups led by eventual baseball Corridor of Famer Craig Biggio, American League MVP Mo Vaughn, Purple Sox/Mets infielder John Valentin, Purple Sox pitcher Kevin Morton, longtime Blue Jays exec Dana Brown and Marteese Robinson, who that 12 months led the nation in hitting at a ridiculous .529.
I used to be a very younger sports activities data director again then with basketball in my blood. It’s actually all I cared about so I typically clashed with Shep due to his hard-charging type and demand for perfection. He would yell at me from the dugout if I missed placing up a strike on the scoreboard, he would get upset if his baseball media information was delayed or anything that he deemed harm his program.
And it was undoubtedly onerous to finish exhausting tutorial years with even longer days and weekends of usually bone-chilling chilly Northeastern baseball – together with bus journeys, hours of pre-game batting follow and even longer video games adopted by media relations, statistics and all the pieces else I needed to do.
Luckily I bought to know Shep a lot better over time  together with on these lengthy bus rides. I later wrote a e book in regards to the 1987 group and bought even nearer to him. We talked usually  as I traced the lives of his gamers again to the teachings they discovered from their coach.
Ardour and loyalty. These phrases outlined Shep. He lived for baseball. He lived for his gamers. He lived for the entire athletes and college students at Seton Corridor.
He was a strolling “life classes” type of man and his “by no means lose your hustle” mantra has been carried on by everybody who was ever  been round him.
He taught me that if you will do one thing, do it proper. I watched him train it. It rubbed off on me.
He was additionally probably the most loyal individual I’ve ever met and everybody concerned in his baseball program turned a part of his household. and his pleasure he took in these round him.
One in all greatest reminiscences I’ve of Shep got here when Craig Biggio was inducted into the Corridor of Fame. I talked so much to Shep again then and his pleasure was clearly off the charts.  He was simply so proud and his tears, smiles, laughter and reminiscences of what he had achieved in his life had been dropped at the forefront. And watching Craig embrace Shep in the whole course of was superb.
Clearly so much in society has modified because the late ’80s and we’ve all tailored to new types of speaking and habits. Shep was undoubtedly old-school. However as we glance again at his life, we must always all notice folks like him are so critically necessary to society.
The mould us, information us and spend their days educating us classes. He modified so many lives together with mine.
Shep was a particular man and will probably be missed. RIP #17.